Tag Archive | patriarchy

First Book in The Hundredth Queen Series

The Hundredth Queen Series by Emily R. King

Fantasy

 

The Hundredth Queen

 

This is the first book in a new series. The ending leaves the story unresolved. The second book is scheduled to release on Sept. 26, 2017.

 

Overall Rating: 4 (xoxo)

 

Quick & Dirty summary: Kalinda has spent her entire life in the care of the temples. As an orphan, she’s lucky that she was taken in by the Sisterhood, especially since she’s afflicted with mysterious fevers. When King Rajah Tarek selects her to be his 100th queen, she has no choice but to accept. But before she can wed the king, she must fight any challengers who want to take her place. Her only ally is her guard, Captain Deven Naik. But her challengers are not the only threat looming and Kalinda isn’t sure she’ll be able to survive.

This is an exciting introduction to a new series. It took me a bit to settle into the story, but there is a lot of intrigue and mystery involved. It’s true to the genre in that there are magical things that happen which adds a lot of excitement.

I enjoy Kalinda and Deven together. They make a good couple and there is a slow burn between them. There is quite a bit of political commentary throughout the novel, as the social structure in the book’s world is very patriarchal. The interesting thing about it, though, is that it’s recent.

I have high hopes for the rest of the series. Emily King seems to have laid quite a bit of groundwork, so I think future books will be even better.

Is it worth buying? (Kindle $4.99)

I was able to get this as a Kindle First book, meaning I got it for free. Since this is just the first book in a series, five dollars is a lot to pay knowing that there’ll be more books. I’d recommend petitioning your library to buy the book or waiting until the series is complete to buy it as a box set. But it’s a very fun series and well worth the read.

Something else you might enjoy:

This book really reminded me of The Bird and the Sword by Amy Harmon. Harmon’s book, though, is much more about language and fate, than this one, giving it a bit more depth to its imagery.