Book Challenge: A Great First Line

2017 Book Challenge

 

A book with a great first line

 

Shopping Series by Julia Kent

Shopping for a Billionaire (Book 1)

 

First line: “I am eating my ninth cinnamon raisin bagel with maple horseradish cream cheese and hazelnut chocolate spread. Don’t judge me.”

Shopping for a billionaire

Synopsis: Shannon Jacoby meets Declan McCormick in the men’s room. With her hand down a toilet. In clothes that belong on a homeless person or a college student. Somehow, they keep running into each other and sparks fly.

Okay, so it’s a great first two lines, but still, who wouldn’t want to continue reading, if only to figure out what the heck is going on?! I happened upon this book by chance. I received it for free from the author. I think I may have won it on Facebook… maybe… I can’t remember. In any case, it was really fun to read. So funny and interesting! One of those books that you can just relax into. However, I’m sad to learn this is just the intro to a 10 book series. Yes, you read that correctly—10 BOOKS!! Now, I’m not afraid of a long series; I did read all of the Sookie Stackhouse books, after all, but still. I’ll have to figure out how I can fit 10 more books into my schedule because these light-hearted, sassy stories need to be in my life.

 

1984 by George Orwell

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First line: It was a bright day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.

Winston Smith (party member #6079), knows that there was a time when Oceania was at war with neither Eurasia nor Eastasia. Unfortunately, he can’t find anyone old enough to confirm and he doesn’t want to risk Big Brother overhearing. Winston knows that the past/his memories don’t lie, he only needs to find evidence that the Party hasn’t already destroyed.

I thought 1984 was required school reading for anyone who went through the American school system. Somehow I was never assigned either of Orwell’s most famous novels, and having read Animal Farm on my own, it was time.

The idea of the clock striking thirteen was eerie and mystical to me; the reality that the line merely refers to a society that goes by military time, written in an era before digital clocks was disappointing. There is no question that the themes in this novel are impactful and may serve as an introduction in critical-thinking towards government, but I couldn’t help myself from thinking Orwell wrote this novel as an excuse to have his 30-page essay on socialism and totalitarianism (Goldstein’s The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism) read on a mass scale. However, I hope that my sons are required to read it in school so they understand the importance of questioning those in a position of power (except my authority, which is unquestionable). How else are they going to understand why the reality show is called Big Brother?

Did you join us in this book challenge? Have you ever picked up a book simply based on the first sentence? Tell us about it!

Up Next: A book with a lion, a witch or a wardrobe. We’ll let you know what book we chose and how we liked it on May 26. Pick your own book so you can read along with us!

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